Those visiting the V Seagrove over the next few months will notice new artwork adorning the restaurant's walls.



The artwork was created by long-time Seagrove resident Didon Comer.



Comer moved to the area in 1979 and is well familiar with the cool canopy that the area's native trees provide.



That natural shade, the beach's dunes, woodsy trails through our state forest, and other sights, Comer recreated with an artsy creative flourish for this one-woman exhibit.



Shades of blues, greens, and golds were used to portray the sights the artist sees in this area she calls home.



Comer paints with acrylics, a medium she prefers because of its heavy texture, which she feels is more like sculpture.



As to what inspires her, Comer said she goes with her mood, which sometimes leads to a series of pieces. First came animals, she said, then architectural influences, than abstracts, seascapes, and now trees.



All work hanging at The V Seagrove is new and created for this exhibit. Viewers will find trees, landscapes, and what Comer describes as her "misty people." 



Comer began painting in 1992 when she took her first class. She sold her first painting that year.



Taking up painting was a natural progression for Comer. Her grandfather was an artist and sculptor and once she finally had time to pick up the brushes, the rest seemed to come naturally.



"My grandfather was my best friend and a huge presence in my life," she said.



Comer was born and raised in New Orleans and moved to Atlanta after marrying.



"Our family discovered Seagrove around 1949 and little by little we all came here, raised our kids and grandkids and started buying property. My husband and I moved here as soon as our daughter left for college. I was sick of the city. We've never looked back," she said.



Comer's work will hang at The V Seagrove indefinitely, and her work can be viewed at Coastal Branch Library during the month of March, and is part of the current exhibit at the South Walton campus of Northwest Florida State College.