EDITOR'S NOTE: This story originally ran in a 2011 edition of The Sun.



In the Seaside of the future, residents and visitors may be able to get a birdís eye view of the famous South Walton community.



In the original Seaside footprints, plans called for an observation tower to be constructed in the middle of town. Thirty years later, in the midst of almost total build out, there is no tower ó but there will be, according to builders, who are completing stage work in the amphitheater.



The iconic Seaside Post Office was moved 30 feet closer to County Road 30A last year to make room for what was then described as a need for a larger stage area in the amphitheater.



However, reports are now that the move also was to accommodate the planned tower.



"These plans have been ongoing for 30 years," said Tom Stein, project supervisor.



While the plans may have been on the drawing board for 30 years, they have been in the working stage for only the past six months.



Seaside officials declined to provide a rendering of the tower as it is still considered to be in the conception stage, said Pam Avera, vice president and general manager at Seaside Community Development Corp.



But renderings of the tower are available online.



The fabled Krier tower was designed by famed architect Leon Krier to anchor the town at its center. When completed, the area will be a performing stage/piazza, which can also be used for hanging out or dining.



In constructing the stage, in addition to concrete, approximately 700 pieces of coral were used, each one unique.



Use of coral was the idea of town founder Robert Davis, said Stein.



"It will make a fancy foundation for the tower, and when finished will look like a million dollars," he said.



The coral was cut and installed by Mick Dunn of Celtic Stone Masonry.



In addition to the coral, the stainless steel handrails to the stage were created by Quicksilver Fabrication in Freeport, and there will be 41 LED lights installed around the stage.



"Seaside is classical architecture and this stage area is important because it is the center," said Stein.



"It will be spectacular when completed," agreed Dunn.



Completion of the stage is expected in the next couple of weeks. It is not totally set in stone when construction would begin on the tower.