Managing whatever wealth is accumulated during one’s working years has always been a challenge.



When to play it conservatively and when to take risks are questions most of us struggle with, and unfortunately, sometimes we come out on the losing end.



J.D. Joyce has worked in the investment field for 19 years. He has penned a novel that focuses on the couple Rich and Peg Viva, who have money to invest, thanks to selling a company they owned.



The book also tells the stories of others who are older than them and shows the effects of the choices they made.



Joyce gave an example from the book of Rich Viva attending a high school reunion and encountering three of his former teachers.



Teacher No. 1 didn't invest in the stock market and now in her late 70s, she has outlived her money.



Teacher No. 2 put the majority of her money in one holding, which ended up like Enron.



"One was too conservative and the other too aggressive," explained Joyce.



And his third example is of Mrs. Sharpwell, who invested wisely and did well even though she didn't have a well-paying job.



"Investing wisely is about balanced investing," he said.



Joyce said he uses the stories in the book of fictional people and what they choose to do with their money as examples for readers of what can happen if too much risk is taken, or if no risk is taken.



"Runners learn to keep an even pace, and it's the same with portfolios," he said.



And if you're a wine drinker, Joyce added two chapters about Rich and Peg's trip to Sonoma wine country where they learn of allocation, and that the ultimate blend comes from large, mid and small vineyards and companies.



The fables or stories in the book appear in a running narrative as a clever approach to chapter messages spanning multiple phases of life's journey. The thread throughout is the Vivas and the characters they encounter.



Joyce is a native of Texas and now lives and works in Houston where he teaches investment planning concepts. However, he has owned a home in Seagrove for three years.



In "The Story of Rich," Joyce weaves into one of the stories a mention of 30A, as a goal of one of the characters is to buy a second home on 30A.



"Taking goals into consideration is important in considering how to invest," said Joyce, "as is your time horizon."



"I always wanted to write a book," he continued. "Investors tend to focus on irrelevant issues and miss important ones. Fundamentals are what is important and in the book, I help people see how to adhere to core principles in financial planning."



Joyce will sign copies of his book at The Hidden Lantern book store in Rosemary Beach during Rosemary Beach Uncorked this Saturday.



Check the book's website at www.thestoryofrich.com.