KEEPING THE FAITH: More than words — a love letter

Ronnie McBrayer

Ronnie McBrayer

Published: Thursday, February 6, 2014 at 01:20 PM.

With Valentine’s Day upon us, you might be looking for a story of true love, a love that lasts longer than a couple’s first argument, or at least lasts beyond the few weeks of a much-hyped reality show about bachelors and bachelorettes. Well, I’ve got a good one for you.

Frederick and Elizabeth Noble got married on New Year's Day, 1941. It was a quick ceremony, as Frederick was on a 48-hour leave from his British Tank Regiment. It was World War II, of course, and Frederick’s absence would be a hallmark of the couple’s first few years together. He was always away from home and his life was always at risk.

Between military assignments all over Europe and Asia, Frederick took time to write love letters and send telegrams back to Elizabeth; hundreds of them. He wrote about life on the front, the war, the men with whom he served and the weather. But mostly he wrote about home and how much he missed his new bride.

One of Frederick’s letters reads, on the occasion of a leave that was retracted, “I'm very sorry my beloved, I can't get home. That's all I live for, home and you.” Finally, Frederick did make it home, for good. And rarely did he leave Elizabeth’s side again. The two settled in the English countryside and raised a large, beautiful family.

After both had died, their children and grandchildren began going through their things, as the survivors must do, when they opened a tea chest that contained, apparently, almost every love letter Frederick and Elizabeth had ever exchanged. There were hundreds of them. Many were from the war years, but some were exchanged very late in life, while the couple was in their 90s. It is an extraordinary collection of love notes spanning more than seven decades.

Yet, the collection, in and of itself, is just that: A collection. It’s an assemblage of words. What gives the collection power is what gives all such things their power: The love that brought them into being.

For each word was driven by devotion. Every sentence was carefully constructed with affection. Each paragraph served as a confession of a love stronger than death, a love that would not allow this husband and wife to live one day away from the other. Indeed, Frederick and Elizabeth both died in December 2011 — just days apart. Love had truly made the two, one.



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