6 p.m. - A tropical storm warning has been issued for Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties.

Double red flags have been implemented on Walton County beaches and water along the beaches closed at 5 p.m.

4 p.m. EDT - Subtropical Storm Alberto is expected to strengthen as it moves north over the eastern Gulf of Mexico, according to the latest update from the National Hurricane Center. 

The 4 p.m. position was 23.3 degrees north, 85.1 degrees west, about 95 miles north of the western tip of Cuba.

Heavy rainfall is continuing to spread northward through Florida as the storm moves toward the north near 13 mph.

A slower northward or north-northeastward motion is expected tonight, followed by a north-northwest turn on Sunday, and this general motion should continue into Tuesday, the 4 p.m. advisory said.

Forecasters expect the center of Alberto to move over the eastern Gulf of Mexico tonight through Sunday night, and approach the northern Gulf Coast in the warning area on Monday. Heavy rainfall and tropical storm conditions will likely reach the northern Gulf Coast well before the arrival of the center of Alberto.

Highest winds remained 40 mph and the barometric pressure decreased to 999 millibars. Gradual strengthening is expected until the system reaches the northern Gulf Coast on Monday.

A tropical storm warning has been issued for the west coast of the Florida peninsula from Bonita Beach to the Anclote River, as well as
the northern Gulf Coast from the Aucilla River westward to the Mississippi/Alabama border.

2 p.m. EDT - The center of Subtropical Storm Alberto has reformed over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico with bands of heavy rainfall affecting western Cuba and southern Florida, hurricane forecasters say.

The 2 p.m. position was 22.8 degrees north, 85.2 degrees west.

The storm is moving toward the north near 13 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center's 2 p.m. advisory. A northward or north-northeastward motion is expected today, followed by a slower north-northwestward motion on Sunday and Monday.

Heavy rains will begin to affect the central Gulf coast region into the southeastern United States on Sunday and continue into the middle of next week as Alberto moves northward after landfall, the advisory said.

Rainfall totals of 5-10 inches with maximum amounts of 15 inches are possible along the track of Alberto from eastern Louisiana, across much of Mississippi, Alabama, western Tennessee and the western Florida panhandle.

11 a.m. EDT - Subtropical Storm Alberto has begun moving north-northeast toward the Yucatan Channel and the Gulf of Mexico, hurricane forecasters say.

Subtropical Storm Alberto is moving toward the north near 10 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center's 11 a.m. advisory. A northward or north-northeastward motion is expected today, followed by a turn to the northwest on Sunday.

The center of Alberto is expected to move near the western tip of Cuba this afternoon, track across the eastern Gulf of Mexico tonight through Monday, and approach the northern Gulf Coast in the watch area Monday night.

Highest winds remained 40 mph and the barometric pressure remained 1005 millibars. 

Forecasters expect Alberto to strengthen while moving northward over the Gulf Of Mexico until the system reaches the northern Gulf Coast by Monday night.

Heavy rainfall is expected to affect Western Cuba, Florida and the northeastern Gulf coast through the weekend, the NHC advisory said. Winds of 40 mph extend outward up to 140 miles mainly to the east of the center.

The 11 a.m. position was 21.6 degrees north, 84.9 degrees west.

A tropical storm warning has been issued for the Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys, according to the NHC. Tropical storm conditions are expected in Cuba and the Dry Tortugas within 48 hours.

A tropical storm watch has been issued for the west coast of the Florida peninsula from Boca Grande to Anclote River. The tropical storm watch along the coast of the Florida panhandle has been extended eastward to the Aucilla River. Tropical storm conditions are possible along the coast of the panhandle within the next 48 hours.

A storm surge watch has been extended eastward to Crystal River, Florida.

Saturday morning, Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency across the state.

"This morning, I have declared a state of emergency across FL to ensure our state has the resources they need to keep their families safe and prepare for the torrential rain and severe flooding Subtropical Storm Alberto will bring," Gov. Scott tweeted.

The governor also said that 5,500 Florida National Guard members available for deployment if needed. The Florida Department of Safety and Motor Vehicles, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement are actively monitoring Subtropical Storm Alberto and are standing by to respond as needed.

"(The storm is) still in a holding pattern," Okaloosa County Public Information Officer Christopher Saul said. "(We are) preparing for the storm and monitoring it along with the National Weather Service."

Santa Rosa and Walton counties continue to monitor the storm, as well.

 

4 a.m. EDT - The storm, which has not yet become fully tropical, was located 150 miles east-southeast of Cozumel Island off the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico and was moving north-northeast at 7 mph, the National Hurricane Center said in its 4 a.m. advisory.

Highest winds remained 40 mph and the barometric pressure was down a single millibar to 1005.

The storm is expected to pick up the pace later today and turn toward the northwest tomorrow, bringing it near the central Gulf Coast on Monday night. Gradual strengthening is expected, although Alberto is not forecast to become a hurricane.

Escambia, Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties in Northwest Florida remain under a storm surge and tropical storm watch.

The 4 a.m. position of Alberto was 19.9 degrees north, 85.6 degrees west.

Officials in Northwest Florida are closely monitoring the storm, but no special preparations had been made as of Friday afternoon.

"We're still monitoring at this point," Santa Rosa County Public Information Officer Brandi Whitehurt said. "It will probably be (Saturday) before we make any additional decisions."

Local government offices in Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties already are closed Monday for the Memorial Day holiday. Events including the Milton Memorial Day Ceremony and the ceremony at Navarre Park have been canceled. Santa Rosa County will decide whether or not to close the Santa Rosa County Landfill on Saturday, Whitehurst said.

The Gulf Islands National Seashore have closed the following areas because of the storm:

Fort Pickens Area: Last entry at noon Saturday; all visitors must leave by 5 p.m. Fort Pickens Campground: Mandatory evacuation will begin at noon Saturday; all campers must evacuate by 5 p.m. Opal Beach Cluster: Last entry at noon Saturday; all visitors must leave by 5 p.m. Perdido Key Area will be closed to all visitor use and access at 5 p.m. Saturday Okaloosa Area will be closed at noon Saturday Naval Live Oaks and Fort Barrancas Areas will close at normal times Saturday

Okaloosa County is on alert and will continue to monitor the storm, according to Public Information Officer Christopher Saul.

The same is true in Walton County.

"There's really no changes right now," Emergency Management Director Jeff Goldberg said. "We're still predicting the same amount of rain. They're looking at it taking a westerly track once it gets into the Gulf, so as long as it keeps up with that, we'll just be doing some preparedness messaging and setting up some updates."