With drinking water in limited supply in Panama City, a local brewery switched their focus from mixing hops to canning water.

Every time a major storm rolls around, Frasier Hansen, the founder and head brewer of Idyll Hounds Brewing Company, said he tops off his water tanks just in case disaster strikes — and this time, it did.

"I'm definitely worried about everybody out there," Hansen said. "I've heard some really bad stories, and I definitely just want people to stay safe. ... It's not over, the hurricane's gone, but there's a lot of damage."

Since Tuesday, the team at Idyll Hounds has taken more than 250 cases of water to Panama City — each containing 24 cans — and plans to make a couple more trips before shifting their focus toward gathering other supplies.

"I think it's kind of different whereever you are," Hansen said when asked what supplies are needed the most. "At this point, it seems like there's a fair amount of water everybody's getting and a lot of food being brought in."

Their cans are either 16 or 12 ounces, and the team usually donates 20-50 cases at each drop-off zone.

When the storm hit, Hansen said that Idyll Hounds had over 80 barrels of hot and cold water on deck. Shortly after, they sent out a Facebook post for anyone in need.

"Not a lot of people were able to get over right at first," he said. "We were basically just like draining water out of the bottom of the tanks because there was no power and then the power came back on and that's when we started canning immediately."

Hansen said he thought about getting plain water labels in the past, but after Hurricane Michael, he said he'll be sure to have them in the future.

Idyll Hounds has around 10 different drop-off locations in Panama City, including Panama City Methodist Church and others further into Lynn Haven.

"It's pretty sketchy over there," Hansen said. "I feel like we're getting (the water) in pretty deep (into Panama City) and around the area, but you know, I'd like to get it further into Mexico Beach and help people farther in there."

After the new shipment of cans comes in, Hansen said he'll reassess and decide where to direct the group's efforts next. If they aren't donating water, the brewery will act as a drop off point for supplies.

"A lot of people got hit pretty hard," he said. "A lot of houses are just completely gone and people have to start their lives over. ... It's pretty crazy."