Alys beach will soon welcome a multi-function wellness center to help members find peace through activity.

ZUMA, as the facility will be called, was named after a Mediterranean word for peace and wellness, according to Alyssa Walker, a Point Washington resident and Alys' marketing director.

The beachfront community is focused on enhancing its guests' inner wellness while on a fitness-focused vacation, and ZUMA will feature amenities like a smoothie bar, cardio and weight training rooms, massage and recovery areas, a pool and a red-clay tennis court, which Walker said is the first on 30A.

Alys plans to have the facility up and running by March 2019.

"It's a monumental building that we're putting in," Walker said. "It's 15,000 square feet, so calling it a fitness center does not do it justice."  

At the facility's center will be a grassy court yard for guests to do yoga, meditate and enjoy company outside.

The pool room's ceiling also features a unique design and is split down the middle, allowing natural airflow and sunlight in.

Walker said homeowners will receive automatic memberships and that a limited number of memberships will also be offered to people living outside of Alys Beach.

"I think providing multiple amenities for homeowners initially is fantastic," said T.J. Middleton, an Old Seagrove resident and Aly's director of fitness and tennis, whose tennis background runs deep, having won a national championship at the University of Georgia, played more than a decade professionally. 

He added that he's excited for renters and vacationers to be able to utilize the new facility.

According to Walker, Alys Beach is growing fast and is already bigger than Seaside.

Walker said that the 158-acre area that the town sits on was named after the matriarch of the family that owns the property, and currently, Alys has around 200 homes, but plans to build around 600 more.

Once ZUMA is complete, Middleton said Alys Beach will be able to host fitness events, designate an area of zen for its users and offer something truly unique to the area.

"It is a pillar for wellness, and it's not just going to be a place where people can go and take classes, it's going to be a congregation area," Walker said.