The skies are literally the limit for one high-flying junior at Seacoast Collegiate High School.

Alex Beer said he remembers discovering his love for flying while traveling around the world with his family to places like Panama, Ecuador, Mexico and Nicaragua. Now, at 17 years old, the fully-dual-enrolled student has his private pilot's license and no plans of slowing down.

"I either want to fly for an airline, or fly cargo routes, or even fly corporately, I'm not 100 percent sure yet," Alex said. "I'm not looking so much into the military, although it would be fun to fly an F-16."

He said there were different levels of pilot's licenses, with the highest being an airline transport license. To get there, he'll have to log more hours, learn to fly with zero viability and take different written exams along the way. As of now, he has around 140 flying hours with half of them being solo trips. 

"It's something he and I can do together to have memories and try out some new restaurants," said his father, Jason Beer.

Jason said that often times, the pair will take out-of-state weekend trips, trying new food joints at each stop. These trips let them spend quality time together while also giving Alex an opportunity to log more flight hours.

He was first introduced to the idea of flying while on a layover at a Houston airport. Jason said they were looking out onto the runways, and to his surprise, Alex was able to name every plan there.

He asked Alex if he would be interested in learning to pilot the crafts for himself. Since then, the Beers purchased a Piper Cherokee for Alex to train on and he's been juggling college-level courses, church and learning to fly.

"His mother and I really support him and are proud of him for again, not just the accomplishments, but the life skill of learning to stick with something and that accomplishing things takes time and patience," Jason said. "It's pretty rare for a person of his age to know what they want to do."

Alex said he's grateful to have a father so willing to help him with his career.

When he's away from the cockpit, Alex enjoys hanging with friends, playing video games and said his favorite subject is science.

After graduation, he hopes to enroll at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, where he'll learn to fine tune his high-flying craft. 

"School is my No. 1 priority and flying comes next," Alex said.