“We’ve been going there for 35 years,” Eddie Morgan said. “It’s not just people who need help. It’s our friends who need help. There is a son of a family from there who works (at Harbor Docks). We have four different employees just from Guana Cay and (neighboring island) Marsh Harbor.”

The tiny island of Great Guana Cay in the Bahamas became more than just a vacation destination for Charles and Eddie Morgan a long time ago.

So when Hurricane Dorian relentlessly battered the Bahamas last weekend, the owners of Harbor Docks in Destin didn’t stand on ceremony. They began to formulate a plan.

“We’ve been going there for 35 years,” Eddie Morgan said. “It’s not just people who need help. It’s our friends who need help. There is a son of a family from there who works (at Harbor Docks). We have four different employees just from Guana Cay and (neighboring island) Marsh Harbor.”

What the Morgans did, initially, was announce they were taking in donations to fill up a 60-foot boat to sail to Guana Cay. That plan quickly went by the wayside because the donations overwhelmed the space they had on the boat. On Wednesday, 11 palates full of donations were loaded onto one of the Morgans’ 18-wheeler trucks and headed to Fort Lauderdale, where they’ll be taken by cargo boat to Guana Cay.

“One of the things we’re certainly familiar with here is hurricanes,” Charles Morgan said. “But (in Guana Cay) there’s not a Home Depot within 15 miles they can drive to, and that’s in good times. When something like this happens to a remote area like that, that’s surrounded by water, the complications of getting help and the lack of service go to another level.”

Harbor Docks partnered with non-profit organization Planning Peace to take donations via the Harbor Docks Facebook page, which had raised over $13,000 through Wednesday. The Morgans have taken in another $16,000 in cash donations. All of the money goes toward helping with recovery, as will all of the sales from specially-made t-shirts that arrived on Wednesday.

Harbor Docks is no longer accepting dry goods donations but specialty items are still being accepted. The Morgans plan to fill up the 60-foot boat they originally intended to take the donations on and sail to Guana Cay in the near future.

“It’s a seven-mile island with something like 90 full-time residents,” Eddie Morgan said. “They still haven’t seen a single government official yet, just volunteers from the U.S. coming in and trying to help. Our goal when we go there is to get help to the specific people that need it and to help them start to rebuild.”